Tag: Pop Art

Plastic & Pop – An uneasy alliance today?

Plastic & Pop – An uneasy alliance today?

Artists of the Avant-Garde started using man-made materials like celluloid for sculpture as early as 1916 (Naum Gabo Woman’s Head). In the 1950s the commercial use of plastics exploded. Consequentially it became a material of Pop Art sculptures and multiples of the 1960s. Claes Oldenburg (*1929) started to use PVC, Vynil and Dacron for his soft art pieces, like the somehow touching 120 x 120 cm Switches Sketch (1964).

Andy Warhol’s second show at the Leo Castelli gallery in April 1966 included floating silver pillows, which were made of helium/air-filled metalized plastic film, size 91,4 x 129,5 cm each. A precise gas mixture enabled the shiny plastic balloons to float off the floor and prevented them from sticking to the ceiling. They are still displayed in museums today. It is said that Warhol “wanted to end his painting career with those silver pillows, to let them fly away from the rooftop, but they didn’t really fly away. It was a grand gesture; he was a master of the grand gesture.” (Ronnie Cutrone)

James Rosenquist wanted to make a statement about the piling up of advertising images of a modern consumer society, also of its objects and packaging. A pyramid seemed the adequate image for that kind of dump. In 1971 he created the multiple ‚Mastaba‘ (early Egyptian pyramid) as a lithographic print (76 x 56.1 cm) with a mounted acrylic hour glass containing plastic (!) beads showing the passing of time – or showing it running out quickly, as one might interpret the piece of art today.

Just a quote from the website of the ‘Popart project’ (Preservation Of Plastics ARTefacts research project, funded by the EU commision) to outline today’s problem: “Unfortunately many plastics are simply not designed to last forever and start to degrade almost as soon as they are put on display. If one combines the ubiquity of plastics in artworks and other museum objects with their relatively short life expectancy, and the currently low level of plastic conservation expertise, then it is clear that a massive problem faces the museum community.”

Cats and Dogs – Katzen und Hunde

Cats and Dogs – Katzen und Hunde

(German text below)
Yes, Andy Warhol was a cat lover. He had more than two dozen of them, so the legend goes. They are immortalized in Warhol’s proto-Factory ink drawings for the book ’25 Cats Name(d) Sam and One Blue Pussy’ (link to a rare hand drawing of ‘Sam’). The book was intended as a gift for his New York advertising clients, when he was still working as a graphic artist and lived with his mother in a row house 1342 Lexington Avenue on the Upper East Side. Whether he already had a dog at that time is not known, and also not to be assumed with this gang of cats around. But this changed in the Factory (Midtown Manhattan until 1968, then Union Square), the magnet for hipsters, artists, stars and starlets. And there was Archie.

Sam (one of 25 or so …) & unique Archie


Andy Warhol carried his dachshund everywhere, even to Studio 54 for night-long parties. He became the artist’s alter ego, without the makeup and the wig. Otherwise, Archie was the copy of his boss. He didn’t say a word, just like Warhol. His famous three words: “Hello. Oh? Really?” were already much of what he contributed to a conversation. Andy, not Archie.
Less known is that there were also pugs in the factory around 1985. Jean-Michel Basquiat certainly brought his, and there are Polaroids of three black pugs that Andy Warhol made. ‘Fame’ was the name of the older of the three dogs, a sweet young couple is not known by name.
I will continue my research and report (Thanks Ivana for the inspiration).


Andy Warhol carried his dachshund everywhere, even to Studio 54 for night-long parties. He became the artist’s alter ego, without the makeup and the wig. Otherwise, Archie was the copy of his boss. He didn’t say a word, just like Warhol. His famous three words: “Hello. Oh? Really?” were already much of what he contributed to a conversation. Andy, not Archie.
Less known is that there were also pugs in the factory around 1985. Jean-Michel Basquiat certainly brought his, and there are Polaroids of three black pugs that Andy Warhol made. ‘Fame’ was the name of the older of the three dogs, a sweet young couple is not known by name.
I will continue my research and report (Thanks Ivana for the inspiration).

Yes, Andy Warhol was a cat lover. He had more than two dozen of them, so the legend goes. They are immortalized in Warhol’s proto-Factory ink drawings for the book ’25 Cats Name(d) Sam and One Blue Pussy’ (link to a rare hand drawing of ‘Sam’). The book was intended as a gift for his New York advertising clients, when he was still working as a graphic artist and lived with his mother in a row house 1342 Lexington Avenue on the Upper East Side. Whether he already had a dog at that time is not known, and also not to be assumed with this gang of cats around. But this changed in the Factory (Midtown Manhattan until 1968, then Union Square), the magnet for hipsters, artists, stars and starlets. There was Archie.
Andy Warhol carried his dachshund everywhere, even to Studio 54 for night-long parties. He became the artist’s alter ego, without the makeup and the wig. Otherwise, Archie was the copy of his boss. He didn’t say a word, just like Warhol. His famous three words: “Hello. Oh? Really?” were already much of what he contributed to a conversation. Andy, not Archie.
Less known is that there were also pugs in the factory around 1985. Jean-Michel Basquiat certainly brought his, and there are Polaroids of three black pugs that Andy Warhol made. ‘Fame’ was the name of the older of the three dogs, a sweet young couple is not known by name.
I will continue my research and report (Thanks Ivana for the inspiration).


Andy Warhol carried his dachshund everywhere, even to Studio 54 for night-long parties. He became the artist’s alter ego, without the makeup and the wig. Otherwise, Archie was the copy of his boss. He didn’t say a word, just like Warhol. His famous three words: “Hello. Oh? Really?” were already much of what he contributed to a conversation. Andy, not Archie.
Less known is that there were also pugs in the factory around 1985. Jean-Michel Basquiat certainly brought his, and there are Polaroids of three black pugs that Andy Warhol made. ‘Fame’ was the name of the older of the three dogs, a sweet young couple is not known by name.
I will continue my research and report (Thanks Ivana for the inspiration).




Ja, Andy Warhol war ein Katzenliebhaber. Er hat zwei gute Dutzend von ihnen gehabt, so geht die Legende. Verewigt sind sie in Warhols Proto-Factory Tintenzeichnungen für das Buch ’25 Cats Name(d) Sam and One Blue Pussy’ (Link zu einer seltenen Handzeichnung Warhols von ‘Sam’). Das Buch war als Geschenk für seine New Yorker Werbekunden gedacht, damals arbeite er noch als Grafiker und lebte mit seiner Mutter in einem Reihenhaus 1342 Lexington Avenue in der Upper East Side. Ob er damals schon einen Hund hatte ist nicht bekannt, und auch nicht anzunehmen, bei der Katzenbande im Haus. Doch dies änderte sich in der Factory (Midtown Manhattan bis 1968, dann Union Square), dem damaligen Anziehungspunkt für Hipster, Künstler, Stars und Sternchen. Dort gab es Archie.
Andy Warhol trug seinen Dackel überall hin, sogar zum nachtelangen Feiern ins Studio 54. Er wurde das Alter Ego des Künstlers, ohne das Make-up und die Perücke. Ansonsten war Archie die Kopie seines Herrchens. Er sagte kein Wort, genau wie Warhol. Seine berühmten drei Worte: “Hallo. Oh? Wirklich?” waren schon viel, was er zu einem Gespräch beitrug. Andy, nicht Archie.
Weniger bekannt ist, dass es in der Factory um 1985 herum auch Möpse gab. Jean-Michel Basquiat hat seinen sicher mitgebracht, und es sind Polaroids von drei schwarzen Möpsen überliefert, die Andy Warhol gemacht hat. ‘Fame’ hies der ältere der drei Hunde, ein süßes junges Paar ist nicht namentlich bekannt.
Ich werde weiter recherchieren und berichten (Danke Ivana, für die Inspiration).